2019 LeaderLuncheon Honoree Profile: Kathryn Matayoshi

 
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The 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon, YWCA Oahu’s biggest fundraiser of the year, is happening on May 15, 2019 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, 12 noon-1:30 p.m. We’re looking forward to celebrating the accomplishments of exceptional women leaders and sharing our mission of “Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women” with our guests.

In the weeks leading up to the event, we’ll introduce you to the 2019 LeaderLuncheon honorees. YWCA O‘ahu selected four amazing women who will be highlighted for their contributions in their fields of work and in their communities. Get to know our second 2019 LeaderLuncheon honoree below!


Q&A with Kathryn Matayoshi


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Senior Vice President,
Government Programs &
Account Relationships,
HMSA

What types of qualities make a good leader? 

For me, a good leader is someone who has a sense of purpose and integrity, a person who has the courage to do the right thing even when it’s challenging, and someone who’s able to communicate with empathy. There will always be people who don’t agree. But what’s important is understanding their perspective and knowing how and when to speak up and make the case for your beliefs without alienating others. Most of all, I think a good leader is someone who believes in elevating others above self.


What has helped you become a more effective leader?

I’ve been fortunate to have had different jobs in a variety of organizations. That’s allowed me to get to know people from across Hawai‘i, learn from them, and use those teachings in the work I believe in. My experiences have helped me to maintain a level of curiosity, a willingness to explore new ideas, and understand the value of taking risks and making mistakes. There’s always something to learn when you make mistakes — and those learning experiences have impacted me. 


Name a woman leader who inspires you and why?

My mom was a wonderful role model. She was always working, pushing boundaries, and willing to learn new things. She loved teaching others and was so giving of herself. Yet she always found a way to get things done. She took the first college courses to the Kulani Correctional Facility. At UH Hilo, she led the continuing education program. And after she retired the first time, was the head of volunteer services for Governor Cayetano and started the state volunteer services office. In the early 1960s, she was inspired by President Kennedy to head the Hilo office of Peace Corps training for South East Asia. Being courageous was one of her greatest lessons to me. She was never afraid to speak her mind — not that she was ever disrespectful — but she would speak up to UH presidents and state governors whenever it was something she believed in.

 

What was your dream job growing up?

I always knew that I wanted to be an attorney. In high school, many of us were in the YMCA Youth Legislature. I was the student senate president and Elisa Yadao was speaker of the house. The thing about law that appealed to me was the ability to influence policies and make a difference for people.

 

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

One of my early jobs was working as a summer law clerk for Senior Family Court Judge Betty Vitousek, who started the family courts here in Hawai‘i. She was a truly remarkable woman and I was so fortunate to work for her. I remember a case when an attorney was such a jerk to her. We were all upset, and she was, too. She had known the attorney since he was a baby. We all wanted her to rule against him, but she turned it around and asked us, “Is that the right decision?” Working for her, I learned how important it is to not let negative emotions get in the way of doing what’s right. No matter how you feel about someone, you can’t let those who attack you and the emotions of being defensive get in the way of a good and right decision.

 

What can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

Take the time to share your experiences, to share the problems that you face, the barriers that you’ve met, even ones that you couldn’t overcome. Sharing your time and yourself and your experiences is so valuable, even if it’s just for a minute.


Read Kathryn Matayoshi’s full bio here.


RSVP for the 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon today! Click here.

2019 LeaderLuncheon Honoree Profile: Patricia Tam

 
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The 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon, YWCA Oahu’s biggest fundraiser of the year, is happening on May 15, 2019 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, 12 noon-1:30 p.m. We’re looking forward to celebrating the accomplishments of exceptional women leaders and sharing our mission of “Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women” with our guests.

In the weeks leading up to the event, we’ll introduce you to the 2019 LeaderLuncheon honorees. YWCA O‘ahu selected four amazing women who will be highlighted for their contributions in their fields of work and in their communities. Get to know our third 2019 LeaderLuncheon honoree below!


Q&A with Patricia Tam


Chief Executive Advisor,
Halekulani Corporation

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What types of qualities make a good leader? 

The most important aspect of being a good leader is first being a good person. These key qualities include sincerity, integrity, empathy, respect for others. A good leader embodies a culture that supports sound decision-making, good organizational skills, and a clear thought process.

What has helped you become a more effective leader?

Being an effective leader is a lifelong journey, and I haven’t discovered anything better than pure experience and challenging yourself daily to do something out of your comfort zone. Effectiveness is always in the results, so it is important to identify what successes you hope to accomplish in any initiative.

Name a woman leader who inspires you and why?

There are so many professional women throughout the world, past and present, who are inspirational in their own right (Eleanor Roosevelt, Helen Keller come to mind), but one common denominator for me all my life has been my mother, although it is taking me all my life to realize the impact she has on me and what I am able to achieve to this day. She is my ultimate role model in her strength and incredible ability to handle any life situation. As an immigrant from China, there is no one more single-minded in trying to make life better for her children and determination to do so. I am so happy I have her DNA.

 

What was your dream job growing up?

As a child, I was fascinated by the concept and history of dinosaurs, so I was certain I wanted to become an anthropologist or archaeologist. My dream was shattered when I finally realized that the job included toiling in hot sun and humidity, with dust, dirt and grime as part of the everyday work environment. So I decided to become a writer and author the Great American Novel, which is still a dream in progress.

 

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

Never be afraid to challenge yourself doing new things (at the time my mom said this to me, she was 93 years old, and she is still learning).

 

What can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

There is no better teacher than experience, so I would always advise others never to be afraid of hard work in any field of endeavor, especially when you are young. One of my greatest work experiences during high school was working summers at the Dole Cannery packing plant - 12 hour shifts, 6 nights a week. That job taught me, among other character building skills, work discipline, punctuality, and getting along with both young and old, all of which helped me and continue to guide me in all of my leadership positions. I also learned that assembly work could be mind-numbing, so in all of my future jobs where I could make an impact, I strived to make the work environment inspiring, engaging, and encouraging creativity and healthy discussions.

Read Patricia Tam’s full bio here.


RSVP for the 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon today! Click here.

2019 LeaderLuncheon Honoree Profile: Kathryn Inkinen

 
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The 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon, YWCA Oahu’s biggest fundraiser of the year, is happening on May 15, 2019 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel, 12 noon-1:30 p.m. We’re looking forward to celebrating the accomplishments of exceptional women leaders and sharing our mission of “Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women” with our guests.

In the weeks leading up to the event, we’ll introduce you to the 2019 LeaderLuncheon honorees. YWCA O‘ahu selected four amazing women who will be highlighted for their contributions in their fields of work and in their communities. Get to know our first 2019 LeaderLuncheon honoree below!


Q&A with Kathryn Inkinen


Founder & Advisor
Inkinen & Associates

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What types of qualities make a good leader? 

Good Listener. Passionate. Positive Attitude. Confident. Honest and Trustworthy. Visionary.

What has helped you become a more effective leader?

I have always tried to create and maintain a high standard and level of excellence in everything I do. Build trust and inspire people. Lead by example, but also empower employees as individuals.

Name a woman leader who inspires you and why?

Kepola Dudoit who is the resident artist at YWCA O‘ahu. She participated in the Fernhurst Transition Program (community-based reintegration for women coming out of prison), participated in Dress for Success and joined the Professional Women’s Group. While her life has had many adversities, she is headed for success and is motivated to become a small business owner. She can be a role model and inspire many other women. On a personal note, I heard about quilling over 50 years ago and became interested and did small projects. Kepola will share her quilling techniques with me; her creative skills are inspiring and her positive attitude is contagious.

 

What was your dream job growing up?

I did not have a dream job, but I knew I did not want to be a teacher or nurse which most of the girls in my generation wanted to be. I studied business and was open to learning and taking on career opportunities as they became available. I have been in hospitality, banking and a business owner — all varied but great positions.

 

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

My father in the mid-sixties said to me that I can do anything a boy can do in a career, but “don’t ever forget your roots.”

 

What can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

Share stories and experiences, not only professional but personal successes and hardships. Women need to balance professional with personal family responsibilities to be successful. Give each other confidence and support to move forward in times of adversities toward success. Each woman leader should find a “mentee” to share experiences with or just to be there to listen when needed.

Read Kathryn Inkinen’s full bio here.


RSVP for the 42nd Annual LeaderLuncheon today! Click here.

LAWMAKERS, STAFF DONATE 432 POUNDS OF GENTLY USED CLOTHING TO THE YWCA'S DRESS FOR SUCCESS PROGRAM

Mahalo to the Hawaii State Legislature for a generous donation! Here’s the photo and press release to recap what happened today:

Lawmakers, including members of the Women's Legislative Caucus, collected 432 pounds of gently used professional clothing for the YWCA's Dress for Success program. (Standing, from left) Rep. Della Au Belatti, Rep. Cynthia Thielen, Sen. Rosalyn H. Baker, Rep. Nadine K. Nakamura, Rep. Gregg Takayama, Maryann Bray, YWCA Lead Member Services Associate, Rep. Lisa Kitagawa, House Speaker Scott K. Saiki, Rep. Sylvia Luke, Kepola Dudoit, YWCA resident artist, (seated from left) Rep. Linda Ichiyama (with baby Emily), Rep. Dee Morikawa, Rep. Joy San Buenaventura, and Cecilia Fong, the YWCA Director of Fund Development.

Lawmakers, including members of the Women's Legislative Caucus, collected 432 pounds of gently used professional clothing for the YWCA's Dress for Success program. (Standing, from left) Rep. Della Au Belatti, Rep. Cynthia Thielen, Sen. Rosalyn H. Baker, Rep. Nadine K. Nakamura, Rep. Gregg Takayama, Maryann Bray, YWCA Lead Member Services Associate, Rep. Lisa Kitagawa, House Speaker Scott K. Saiki, Rep. Sylvia Luke, Kepola Dudoit, YWCA resident artist, (seated from left) Rep. Linda Ichiyama (with baby Emily), Rep. Dee Morikawa, Rep. Joy San Buenaventura, and Cecilia Fong, the YWCA Director of Fund Development.

Honolulu, Hawaiʻi – Members and staff at the Hawaiʻi State Legislature have donated 432 pounds of gently used professional clothing, shoes, handbags, and other assorted items to the Dress for Success Program hosted by the YWCA O‘ahu.

The items were collected from March 25 to April 10 and presented to the YWCA today. The clothing will be provided to women – many of them formerly incarcerated – making a second start in life with the help of the YWCA. 

Dozens of individuals brought, bags, boxes, and bundles of clothes, nearly filling the entire front portion of Representative Gregg Takayama's Office (District 34 - Pearl City, Waimalu, and Pacific Palisades).

"This will be a great help for recently incarcerated women to look their best when applying for and working at a new job," said Takayama, Chair of the House Public Safety, Veterans & Military Affairs Committee. "I want to thank everyone for their compassion and generosity to help these women, especially the members of the Women's Legislative Caucus."

Receiving the donations on behalf of the YWCA were Maryann Bray, Lead Member Services Associate; Cecilia Fong, Director of Fund Development; and Kepola Dudoit, resident artist.

For more information, go to https://www.ywcaoahu.org/dress-for-success

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Honolulu Biennial 2019

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Opening Friday, March 8, YWCA Laniākea will exhibit art as part of the downtown loop of Honolulu, featuring many of the city’s most important historic buildings in complement and contrast to the bustling nature of the city’s urban center. Aliʻiolani Hale, Foster Botanical Garden, Hawaiʻi State Art Museum and YWCA Laniākea will host works from Honolulu Biennial artists to include 10 new commissions and 10 site-specific installations.

The YWCA Laniākea is home to an era of tremendous social awareness and change in Hawaiʻi. Its history inspires generations of women to rededicate themselves to the cause of community service as part of the YWCA Oahu’s broader mission to empower women and eliminate racism -- a fitting partner site for Honolulu Biennial 2019.

YWCA Laniākea will host four artists, including three newly commissioned works.

A central feature of the YWCA installations will be a new fibre-based commission by Maui-based artist Chenta Laury (African American | Hawaiʻi). Seattle-based artist Ellen Lesperance (United States) will present a new commission - -four paintings that recreate historic knit garments worn my women at acts of civil disobedience. The paintings were inspired by a photograph of a Greenham Common Camper protester wearing a sweater that was created to look like a newspaper. Central Pacific Time (Kānaka Maoli, United States | Hawaiʻi) is both a collective created by Roger and Lei Bong and their online radio station streaming from Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. The collective’s mission is to provide a platform for the community to explore and navigate Hawaiʻi’s past, present and future through sound and story. They will present an interactive audio installation titled, Wiliau: Entwined Currents. This new installation reinterprets compositions written by Queen Liliʻuokalani during her imprisonment (1895-1896), allowing visitors to manipulate the audio tracks through movement.

The Honolulu Biennial will announce information on public programming in February. To keep up to date on all the latest from the Honolulu Biennial Foundation follow @honolulubiennial on Instagram, and sign-up for the newsletter at honolulubiennial.org. For questions related to YWCA Laniākea site, please contact rjones@ywcaoahu.org.