LeaderLuncheon profile: Crystal Rose

40th Annual LeaderLuncheon  |  June 14, 2017  |  12:00-1:30pm  |  Sheraton Waikiki

Crystal Rose is a founding partner of Bays Lung Rose Holma. Crystal focuses on real estate, business, construction, and trust litigation. She has taken on some of the largest and most complex civil cases that have reshaped Hawaii’s business landscape. She also provides counseling and litigates disputes for clients, and is an expert in corporate governance. The Hilo native gives back to her community by serving on the Board of Directors for a variety of nonprofits, including The Nature Conservancy, Blue Planet Foundation, and Child and Family Service; plus large corporations such as Hawaiian Airlines, Gentry Homes, and Central Pacific Bank. Crystal also volunteers on the advisory boards of Kamehameha Schools, Catholic Charities, and many more.


Q & A with Crystal Rose

WHAT TYPES OF QUALITIES MAKE A GOOD LEADER?

A great leader is someone with a passion for a goal or objective that is larger than them that adds value to their business and our community. Someone who is competent, strategic and focused ~ with a kind heart and an energetic ear. 

WHAT HAS HELPED YOU BECOME A MORE EFFECTIVE LEADER?

Always striving to do the right thing. Seeking advise when needed. Learning from my mistakes and mishaps over the years. And, having a fabulous husband and two wonderful sons who support me 110%!!

NAME A WOMAN LEADER WHO INSPIRES YOU AND EXPLAIN WHY.

Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop ~ she was a visionary, servant leader whose compassion and foresight continues to serve our Hawaiian children today and for generations to come. Education is an equalizer and Princess Pauahi understood its power and purpose for her people.

WHAT WAS YOUR DREAM JOB GROWING UP?

I really don’t recall having a dream job – I just wanted to do something that would have meaning and value.

WHAT’S ONE OF THE BEST PIECES OF ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED?

Follow your passion. Never give up.

AS A WOMAN LEADER, WHAT CAN YOU ADVISE OTHERS TO DO TO HELP EACH OTHER OR HELP THE NEXT GENERATION OF WOMEN LEADERS?

Support each other! Develop your own personal business plan that provides you with a vision for your future and specific goals that you can achieve incrementally. Share it with our mentors. Seek advice from those that support you. Revise your plan as circumstances change but stay focused. Be courageous in thought and purpose. 

LeaderLuncheon honors women for the contributions they have made to their professions and in their community.  Join us in supporting Hawaii’s commitment to the advancement of women leaders by attending the 2017 LeaderLuncheon. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 695-2620 or click on the button below. 

LeaderLuncheon profile: Bettina Mehnert

40th Annual LeaderLuncheon  |  June 14, 2017  |  12:00-1:30pm  |  Sheraton Waikiki

Bettina Mehnert.jpg

Bettina Mehnert was AHL’s first female principal, director, and Chief Operating Officer, and in 2013, became the firm’s first female president and CEO. Under her guidance, AHL elevated its reputation as a high-tech firm and earned an international award for its innovative design of the Walgreens flagship store. The German native also helped spearhead AHL’s 1% Pro Bono program, which donates 1% of its hours to a design or planning project for local nonprofits. In her spare time, Bettina serves on the Board of Directors for YMCA Honolulu and PBS Hawaii, and is a trustee for St. Andrew’s Schools. In addition to her many individual awards and honors, Bettina was recently recognized as a Fellow in the American Institute of Architecture.


Q & A with Bettina Mehnert

What types of qualities make a good leader?

-    As a leader I believe you need to have patience when dealing with people to help them understand and appreciate decisions and circumstances, as well as giving them time to grow.

-    You need grit. Some things require extra effort and determination.

-    Courage and accountability. You need to be able to make a decision and commit to it. You also need humility and courage to admit and adjust when things don't go as planned.

-    And finally, passion. Liking, loving what you do comes across to other people and helps both your clients and your staff.

What has helped you become a more effective leader?

Patient mentors, and a good degree of impatience with myself.

Name a woman leader who inspires you and explain why.

Zaha Hadid, who was the first woman to win the most coveted prize in architecture, the Pritzker prize. She was extraordinarily intelligent, sophisticated and a true pioneer of contemporary design. Architecture is still a field of predominately men, and she showed how gender could fade into the background if it was systematically taken out of the equation in favor of an appreciation of sheer talent. 

I cried when she died last year. She continues to inspire me with her courage of convictions and her vision of leadership.

What was your dream job growing up?

I always wanted to be a jockey and race horses. Being outside, being close to one of my favorite animals, working with them all day, and …. Racing. It sounded heavenly.

Then I grew too tall.

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

“If you didn't get what you wanted, you didn’t try hard enough.” and “No matter what you do, you need to be able to sleep at night.” 

As a woman leader, what can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

-    I believe that the single most important thing women can do is to support each other. Help each other professionally, personally and emotionally. There's a lot to be said for the benefits of what uses to be the "old boys network." Women should learn from that.  The book, Broad Influence by Times correspondent Jay Newton-Small describes how the women in the past administration banded together to make sure they were at the right meetings and found the courage to open the door to portals of power.  That concept is still applicable.

-    Don't take things personally. Business decisions aren't personal - they're business.

-    Ask questions and speak up. Women are often more considerate and as a result can appear less of a power player. Communicate!

LeaderLuncheon honors women for the contributions they have made to their professions and in their community.  Join us in supporting Hawaii’s commitment to the advancement of women leaders by attending the 2017 LeaderLuncheon. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 695-2620 or click on the button below. 

LeaderLuncheon profile: Connie Mitchell

40th Annual LeaderLuncheon  |  June 14, 2017  |  12:00-1:30pm  |  Sheraton Waikiki

Connie Mitchell has led The Institute for Human Services (IHS) and stood at the forefront of addressing homelessness in Hawai‘i for over 10 years. During her tenure, IHS grew from serving 1,400 to more than 5,000 individuals through the development of case management, housing, employment, health promotion, and healing programs, and an array of specialty shelters for homeless people in our community. Prior to IHS, Connie established a nurse-run rural clinic on Hawai‘i Island and was Director of Nursing at the Hawai‘i State Hospital, where she helped settle a consent decree with the U.S. Department of Justice. She serves on the boards of EPIC Ohana, Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California, and the State’s Workforce Development Council. She is firmly committed to cross sector collaboration in the interest of social innovation.


Q & A with Connie Mitchell 

What types of qualities make a good leader?

Good leaders are people who are open to continuous learning; willing to take calculated risks; and willing to take responsibility for failures and recognizes her team when there are achievements to celebrate.  Good leaders also genuinely care about the people who they are serving.  They don’t put them in harm’s way needlessly.  Good leaders share by trying to cultivate leadership among those they lead.

What has helped you become a more effective leader?

Criticism helps keep me humble and self –reflective.  But it’s not about me, so I’d also say being aware and observant of people and the environment in which you are delivering services or a product is essential.   I need to be aware of any changing trends that could impact my ability to execute our mission.  I’ve always been someone who invests time in becoming more knowledgeable and skilled so that I’m able to improve on something our team is doing and also so that we are ready to execute ona new opportunity that may present itself.  I like to pick the brains of all kinds of people, especially successful entrepreneurs, scientists and ministers.

Name a woman leader who inspires you and explain why.

Connie Lau is someone I deeply admire.  She exemplifies for me a wonderful combination of strength, brains, beauty anda hardworking spirit.  She knew that being competent and consistent in executing projects that were assigned to her would inspire respect among colleagues and competitors alike.  She also presents as a very pragmatic person when it came to blending her work life with her personal life and she always looks great.  On a personal note,  my mother Jane Fong has been a role model for me in extending generous hospitality to others, working hard to achieve her goals and having the courage and audacity to make investments that others might discourage.  She got my father to buy a home instead of renting one and she obviously has no regrets.  She is 85 today and she is still helping others in a myriad of ways.

What was your dream job growing up?

I actually entertained the notion of becoming a journalist before I settled on a career in nursing.  I knew nursing was my calling because I enjoyed extending health and healing to people through care and healing touch.   In any case, my dream job would have to have variety, let me put my skills to good use and require me to problem solve challenging situations.  Perhaps I found my dream job at IHS!

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

Develop tough skin.  The more you accomplish, the more you should expect detractors to see a target on your back and lob criticism your way.  Another one:  You don’t have to  everything all figured out to move forward with a decision.  If you’re open to feedback, you can always do course corrections along the way.

As a woman leader, what can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

Be the best “you” that you can be.  Everyone has a different style of leadership.  But being genuine is critical.  Being a leader was never something I aspired to be.  It was out of necessity in certain situations when someone was needed to step forward to lead and say “Let’s go this way…” that I was enlisted and subsequently entrusted with the responsibility of leadership. Once it was entrusted, I carried that mantle of responsibility with serious thought, never wanting to let people down.  I’ve had my share of failures and I’m not perfect by any means.  But when I’m “in” (committed).  I’m in all the way.  I guess I expect the same of those who lead beside me.  Young women need to see women leaders who are making change, in their own way.  It won’t be the same as how a many might do it.  But it has no less power and impact…maybe more.

LeaderLuncheon honors women for the contributions they have made to their professions and in their community.  Join us in supporting Hawaii’s commitment to the advancement of women leaders by attending the 2017 LeaderLuncheon. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 695-2620 or click on the button below. 

MCBL Seeks New Mink Leaders

20170301 MCBL Cohort Grad 151 (2).jpg

Want to learn how to leverage your talents and strengths? Do you want to enhance your influence and negotiation skills? If these statements describe you, you could be a good fit for the next Patsy T. Mink Leadership Alliance! The Patsy T. Mink Center for Business & Leadership (MCBL) is currently accepting applications for the next Alliance. Deadline to apply is June 30, 2017!

In September 2016, MCBL selected 14 women to join a new initiative called the Patsy T. Mink Leadership Alliance. The program was created in an effort to increase the representation of women in C-Suite positions by helping emerging female leaders improve their management and leadership skills.

The six-month course covered topics ranging from strategic planning to financial business acumen and culminated with a pinning ceremony on March 1 with the graduates, their families, and their sponsors.

Following the graduation, MCBL’s Advisory Board received feedback from each Mink Leader and used their ideas to improve the evolving program. One of the most significant changes is extending the program from six months to 10 months and the session times from two to five hours.

“Besides all the positive learning from the cohort, the participants wanted to increase the number of sessions and have a longer day to include time to plan a community service project to benefit MCBL & the YWCA,” said Terri Funakoshi, Director of the Patsy T. Mink Center for Business & Leadership.

Funakoshi noted that the new curriculum includes sessions on Emotional Intelligence, HR as a Strategic Business Partner, and Intrapreneurial Thinking. Another added benefit to the program is that one cohort member will be chosen to serve on the MCBL Advisory Board and Leadership Committee for a one-year term—this year’s honorary member will be Isla Young, a director on the Maui Economic Development Board.

 “Being part of the program really helped me to feel confident that I could make a difference and when you see that there’s opportunities to do that we need to stand up,” Young said. “We need to join together, help together and really uplift other women in the community to improve our island state.”

The Mink Leaders have already made good on their promise to give back to the community, by volunteering their time at the Hawaii STEM Conference on May 1-2 at the Hawaii Convention Center.

“Isla shared with us that her team puts on a STEM conference each year, and this year she was bringing the conference to O‘ahu,” said Emi Au, Mink Leader and YWCA O‘ahu Board of Director. “We thought it would be good to lead some workshops on professional and career development to augment the standard STEM sessions, so we decided to put on a negotiation session, speed mentoring session, and a communication session.”

Hear from graduates of the inaugural Leadership Alliance below:

Runjini Murthy, Howard Hughes Corporation:

"I feel so fortunate to be a part of the Patsy T. Mink Leadership Alliance. It’s come along at a perfect time in my career and for the contributions I want to make in my community. I have a new role at my organization and I feel like I’ve learned the strategies and tools I need to speak my mind and speak to a diverse group of stakeholders at my organization."

Jennifer Hee, The Salvation Army:

"Being a Mink Leader means carrying on the legacy of Patsy Mink, our namesake. She is just someone that we can look to as a strong woman leader and she overcame so many obstacles both as an Asian-American and as a woman going through her political career."

Ashlee Kishimoto, Hawaiian Airlines:

"It really took me out of my job and really got me to focus on things that I don’t do on a normal basis. I particularly enjoyed the session that Kat and Shelley held on strategic planning. It really gave me an opportunity to take a step back and think about who I am, where I want to be and where I want to lead this company."

Farrah-Marie Gomes, University of Hawaii at Hilo:                                                     

"As a result of participating in the program I’m now better able to recognize the leadership skills and talents in others. One of the great things about being a leader is giving others the opportunity to lead. And I firmly believe that having more leaders among us makes us all stronger together."
                                                              

If you’re interested in applying for the Patsy T. Mink Leadership Alliance, please click here.

LeaderLuncheon profile: Susan Murray

40th Annual LeaderLuncheon  |  June 14, 2017  |  12:00-1:30pm  |  Sheraton Waikiki

Susan Murray RGB sm.jpg

Susan Murray is the Senior Vice President of The Queen's Health Systems, West O'ahu Region, and Chief Operating Officer of The Queen's Medical Center (QMC) - West O'ahu. After working at hospitals in Hawai'i, Louisiana and Tennessee, Susan joined The Queen's Health Systems to renovate, open and lead The Queen's Medical Center - West O'ahu. Since the medical center opened in 2014, Susan has provided additional services and completed a campus master plan to accommodate the rapid growth that QMC - West O'ahu has experienced. Susan is active in the West O'ahu community partnering with businesses, schools, and other organizations to build a strong and healthy community.  She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the March of Dimes, the First Presbyterian Church, and has previously served on the boards of Manoa Valley Theatre, Healthcare Association of Hawai'i, and Nashville's YWCA.


Q & A with Susan Murray

What types of qualities make a good leader?

A good leader has a clear vision of what she wants to accomplish and goals for success; good communication to motivate and inspire others and the ability to build a team as well as be a good team player.

What has helped you become a more effective leader?

Wonderful people surrounding me has helped me become a more effective leader.  Also, being given opportunities outside my comfort zone.  Ongoing professional education and learning is also key.

Name a woman leader who inspires you and explain why.

Jan Head, who was my mentor and boss for 5 years when I was at Kaiser.  She was selfless, giving, and intentional about growing others professionally and by giving me projects outside my comfort zone.  She also led a balanced life, which I have difficulty doing.

What was your dream job growing up?

Elementary School Teacher

What’s one of the best pieces of advice you’ve ever received?

One of my mentors gave me a plaque with a quote by Goethe, “What you can do, or dream, you can begin it.  Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.”  That is the best advice.

As a woman leader, what can you advise others to do to help each other or help the next generation of women leaders?

Everyone should craft their own development plan and share it with their boss.  If you are the boss, help provide opportunities to prepare others for their next step.  One of my favorite parts of leadership is to watch people grow and succeed.  It is an important activity and worth your time and intention.

LeaderLuncheon honors women for the contributions they have made to their professions and in their community.  Join us in supporting Hawaii’s commitment to the advancement of women leaders by attending the 2017 LeaderLuncheon. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 695-2620 or click on the button below.